UPCOMING & PAST ACTIVITIES

We believe a positive and upbeat atmosphere is fundamental for a healthy environment. A myriad of quality activities that are challenging, educational AND FUN are offered even during this Pandemic. Whether the programs offered are active or passive, virtually or non virtually they make an impact for our clients and our community!  Come check out what Julie is going to offer next!

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Tai Chi Practice Outdoors

TAI CHI FOR ARTHRITIS IS BACK!

Tai Chi for Arthritis is easy, enjoyable and safe for people with arthritis to learn. Medical studies have shown that this program can relieve pain for people with arthritis and improve their quality of lives, as well as preventing falls for older adults.  The  CDC recommends the Tai Chi for Arthritis program.  Although especially effective for arthritis, it is a great start for beginners to improve health and wellness. 

APRIL 12-MAY 21 TUESDAY/THURSDAY 9-10AM CALL JULIE TO REGISTER!  IT'S NOT TOO LATE!

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MARY BIRD PERKINS SCREENING

Although this  program has ended, we did have a great turnout.  Catch us for the next one!

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Yoga Class

VARIOUS EXERCISE PROGRAMS

WBRCOA and YWCA will be partnering in the future. Keep your eyes open for new, upcoming classes that can include:  Yoga, Zumba, Pool Exercises, Chair, Light/Low and Hand Weights.  No dates or cost yet.  STAY TUNED!

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PARKING LOT BINGO

Love Bingo! Not yet ready to interact with everyone but still want to come see your friends?! COME JOIN US on Friday, April 16, 2021 for PARKING LOT BINGO starting at 10am.  Call to reserve your spot!

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JULIE

Call Julie for any activities that you would like to participate in!

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DEBBIE

Call Debbie for any Nutrition Education questions.

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ELDERLY ABUSE

Learn the signs and BREAK the silence!

  • Elder abuse is a silent problem that robs seniors of their dignity, security, and—in some cases—costs them their lives.

  • Up to five million older Americans are abused every year, and the annual loss by victims of financial abuse is estimated to be at least $36.5 billion.

  • Approximately one in 10 Americans aged 60+ have experienced some form of elder abuse. Some estimates range as high as five million elders who are abused each year. One study estimated that only one in 24 cases of abuse are reported to authorities.

 

↑ IN THE PRESS 

 
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TYPES OF ELDERLY ABUSE AND WHEN TO REPORT

March 23, 2021

THE 7 TYPES OF ELDER ABUSE ARE:

  • Physical abuse

  • Sexual abuse

  • Emotional or psychological abuse

  • Neglect

  • Abandonment

  • Financial abuse

  • Self-neglect

WHEN DO I REPORT SUSPECTED ABUSE

•When abuse is suspected

•When there are physical signs that suggests something suspicious is going on

•When the elder tells you so

•When the elder doesn’t tell you so

•When there are no physical signs

•When you notice bruises

•When someone is verbally abusive toward the elder

•When money begins disappearing from their checking/savings account

•When they are left alone with no help

Most types of elder abuse are committed by trusted individuals, but elders can mistreat themselves through self-neglect.

If you suspect that someone over 60 years of age is being abused in any form, please call Louisiana Elderly Protective Services at: 1-833-577-6532

CLICK HERE FOR MORE DETAILED INFORMATION

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COVID-19 STOP THE SPREAD OF GERMS

October 12, 2019

Watch this video on how to stop the spread of, not only Covid 19, but also diseases that spread with touch and emissions.

HANDWASHING DURING COVID

October 12, 2019

Watch this video on why/how to wash our hands during this Pandemic.

FRAUD SURROUNDING COVID-19 IS INCREASING

January 5, 2021

Scammers rapidly alter their tactics and adapt their schemes to the changing landscape, and we anticipate that they will leverage the COVID-19 vaccine to prey on unsuspecting beneficiaries. Be vigilant and protect yourself from potential fraud concerning COVID-19 vaccines and treatments. Here are things you need to know about the COVID-19 vaccine: • You likely will not need to pay anything out-of-pocket to get the vaccine during this public health emergency.
• You cannot pay to put your name on a list to get the vaccine.
• You cannot pay to get early access to the vaccine.
• You will not be solicited door to door to receive the vaccine.
• No one from Medicare or the Health Department with contact you.
• No one from a vaccine distribution site or health care payer, like a private insurance company, will call you asking for your Medicare number, Social Security number, or your credit card or bank account information to sign you up to get the vaccine.

COVID-19 VACCINATION UPDATES

March 24, 2021

PRIORITY GROUPS IN LOUISIANA TO NOW RECEIVE THE COVID VACCINATION

Within priority groups and tiers there is no particular sequencing. Participating providers must make available vaccine available to anyone who is eligible. 

Priority Group 1-A: Ongoing

  • Health care workers at Tier 1 and Tier 2 hospitals

  • Staff and residents of nursing homes and long-term care facilities

  • First responders to serve as vaccinators (Emergency Medical Services, fire personnel, law enforcement)

Priority Group 1-B, Tier One: Ongoing

  • Dialysis providers and patients

  • Ambulatory and outpatient providers and staff

  • Behavioral health providers and staff

  • Urgent care clinic providers and staff

  • Community care providers and staff

  • Dental providers and staff

  • Nonemergency Medical Transportation staff

  • Professional home care providers (including hospice workers and both paid and unpaid home care staff) and home care recipients (including older and younger people with disabilities over the age of 16 who receive community or home-based care, as well as clients of home health agencies)

  • American Sign Language (ASL) interpreters and Support Service Providers (SSPs) working in community and clinic-based settings, and clients who are both deaf and blind

  • Health-related support personnel (lab staff, mortuary staff who have contact with corpses, pharmacy staff)

  • Schools of allied health students, residents and staff

  • Law enforcement and other first responders

  • Persons 65 years old and older

  • Louisiana Unified Command Group

  • State and local essential COVID emergency response personnel

  • Some elections staff ahead of March and April elections

  • Teachers and any other support staff working onsite in K-12 or daycare

  • Legislators and legislative staff

  • All pregnant persons, regardless of age

  • Staff of congregate living facilities

  • Individuals aged 16-64 with at least one of the conditions listed by the CDC as placing them at an increased or likely risk of severe illness from the virus that causes COVID-19. The CDC list of conditions can be found here. They are:

    • Asthma (moderate to severe)

    • Cancer

    • Cerebrovascular disease

    • Chronic kidney disease

    • Chronic liver disease

    • COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease)

    • Cystic fibrosis

    • Severe neurologic conditions such as dementia

    • Down Syndrome

    • Heart conditions, such as heart failure, coronary artery disease or cardiomyopathies

    • Hypertension

    • Immunocompromised state (weakened immune system) from solid organ transplant

    • Immunocompromised state from blood or bone marrow transplant, immune deficiencies, HIV, use of corticosteroids, or use of other immune weakening medicines

    • Obesity (body mass index [BMI] of 30kg/m2 or higher but < 40kg/m2)

    • Severe obesity (BMIC >40kg/m2)

    • Overweight (BMI 25-30 kg/m2)

    • Pregnancy

    • Pulmonary fibrosis

    • Sickle Cell Disease

    • Smoking

    • Thalassemia (a type of blood disorder)

    • Type 1 diabetes

    • Type 2 diabetes mellitus 

Priority Group 1-B, Tier Two: Starting Monday, March 22

  • Higher Education faculty/staff

  • Food and agricultural workers

  • Food service (restaurant/bar) workers, hotel workers, and other hospitality workers

  • Judiciary staff, including judges, court staff, clerks of court and staff, district attorneys and public defenders

  • Postal workers

  • Manufacturing workers

  • Grocery store workers

  • Transportation workers, including river pilots

  • Water and wastewater workers

  • Energy workers

  • Bank tellers

  • Construction workers

  • Clergy

  • IT and communications workers

  • Media workers

  • Public safety engineers and other workers

  • Public health workers

  • Frontline government workers

  • Child, youth, and family service workers

  • Veterinarians and support staff

  • Waste management workers

  • Public and private security and emergency preparedness workers

COVID-19 VACCINE: FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

March 23, 2021

Will I Still Need To Wear A Mask And Practice Social Distancing?

It depends on the circumstance. The CDC now advises that if you are fully vaccinated (14+ days out from completing your vaccine series), you do not need to mask and distance if:

  • You are in a private home exclusively with others who are also fully vaccinated.

  • You are spending time with ONE additional family unit who is not fully vaccinated, and none of them have underlying health conditions placing them at high risk for complications if they become infected with COVID.

Beyond these settings, and anytime you are in public, masking and distancing are still necessary. Masks are especially important due to the COVID variants circulating in the U.S. The CDC now says tight-fitting is better than loose, multiple layers are better and two masks are better.

New data is emerging daily and the CDC is constantly reevaluating its recommendations. We expect masking and distancing to go away soon, particularly for those who are vaccinated. But for now, except for the two examples above, they are still important and recommended.